Shambo taken away


Summary

For months, monks at a Hindu temple have been trying to save the animal from slaughter – after it tested positive for bovine tuberculosis.

南宁桑拿

VIDEO: Shambo shambles

But today police and health officials forcibly removed the revered animal.

UK regulations stipulate that cattle suspected of carrying bovine tuberculosis be slaughtered; the disease can be spread to other cattle, to deer and in rare cases to humans.

But Hindus revere cattle and say killing the bull would violate their religious rights.

Animal health officials and police led Shambo from the monastery to a trailer at around 0430 AEST today.

A webcam site, dubbed Moo Tube, which the monastery set up to show the flower-garlanded bull in his paddock, broadcast images of an empty hay-lined shrine.

Welsh authorities refused to say when, where or how Shambo would be killed.

'Desecration'

Swami Suryananda, one of Shambo's caretakers, said officials had "committed the most violent and ignorant act of desecration of our temple and destroyed an innocent life".

"The perpetrators of this act will suffer the consequences of their actions for generations to come," he said.

Hindus saw the controversy as a religious freedom issue, and took the government to court to prevent Shambo's slaughter.

The monastery argued that it could keep Shambo isolated to prevent the TB spreading, or that it could take the bull to India.

The monastery said authorities had refused both options.

'Community welfare'

Keith Porteous Wood, director of the National Secular Society – which opposes what it sees as excessive religious influence in government affairs – said Shambo's supporters were "putting religious dogma before the welfare of the community".

Last week, a Welsh judge ordered local authorities to reconsider their decision to kill the bull, considered sacred in the Hindu faith.

But the Court of Appeal in London reversed that decision on Monday, ruling that killing him would be justified to prevent the disease's spread.


For months, monks at a Hindu temple have been trying to save the animal from slaughter – after it tested positive for bovine tuberculosis.

苏州皮肤管理中心

VIDEO: Shambo shambles

But today police and health officials forcibly removed the revered animal.

UK regulations stipulate that cattle suspected of carrying bovine tuberculosis be slaughtered; the disease can be spread to other cattle, to deer and in rare cases to humans.

But Hindus revere cattle and say killing the bull would violate their religious rights.

Animal health officials and police led Shambo from the monastery to a trailer at around 0430 AEST today.

A webcam site, dubbed Moo Tube, which the monastery set up to show the flower-garlanded bull in his paddock, broadcast images of an empty hay-lined shrine.

Welsh authorities refused to say when, where or how Shambo would be killed.

'Desecration'

Swami Suryananda, one of Shambo's caretakers, said officials had "committed the most violent and ignorant act of desecration of our temple and destroyed an innocent life".

"The perpetrators of this act will suffer the consequences of their actions for generations to come," he said.

Hindus saw the controversy as a religious freedom issue, and took the government to court to prevent Shambo's slaughter.

The monastery argued that it could keep Shambo isolated to prevent the TB spreading, or that it could take the bull to India.

The monastery said authorities had refused both options.

'Community welfare'

Keith Porteous Wood, director of the National Secular Society – which opposes what it sees as excessive religious influence in government affairs – said Shambo's supporters were "putting religious dogma before the welfare of the community".

Last week, a Welsh judge ordered local authorities to reconsider their decision to kill the bull, considered sacred in the Hindu faith.

But the Court of Appeal in London reversed that decision on Monday, ruling that killing him would be justified to prevent the disease's spread.