New cub joins endangered club


Summary

"This is a delicate period for the cub, but Bai Yun is an experienced mother," the zoo said in a press release.

南宁桑拿

Only about 1,600 giant pandas remain in the wild, and fewer than 180 live in captivity.

In August 1999, Bai Yun gave birth to Hua Mei, who has, in turn, given birth to three sets of twins since moving to China in 2004, including a pair in July.

Fourth cub

The cub is the fourth for Bai Yun, who was put on 24-hour watch after officials detected a foetus and foetal heartbeat through ultrasound images July 18.

The cub's gender was not immediately known.

"All we've seen so far is a leg and a tail," says Dr Ron Swaisgood, co-head of the zoo's panda program.

The panda showed signs of going into labour, getting restless and frequently shifting position in a private den, Dr Swaisgood says.

When the cub finally came, Bai Yun quickly scooped it up and clutched it to her breast.

The cub hardly cried at all – evidence of its mother's deftness.

"Usually the mother will bobble the cub or her paw will slip and the cub will cry until it's repositioned," says Dr Swaisgood.

"But (Bai Yun) was keeping that cub so content it didn't cry at all. It made a few squawks and that was it."

The newborn panda is about the size of a stick of butter, or one-thousandth the size of its mother, Dr Swaisgood says.

Zookeepers will not get near the cub for at least a few days.

They hope to get a clear view of the creature on a closed-circuit camera, but typically a mother panda will hunch protectively over the cub to obscure it.


"This is a delicate period for the cub, but Bai Yun is an experienced mother," the zoo said in a press release.

苏州皮肤管理中心

Only about 1,600 giant pandas remain in the wild, and fewer than 180 live in captivity.

In August 1999, Bai Yun gave birth to Hua Mei, who has, in turn, given birth to three sets of twins since moving to China in 2004, including a pair in July.

Fourth cub

The cub is the fourth for Bai Yun, who was put on 24-hour watch after officials detected a foetus and foetal heartbeat through ultrasound images July 18.

The cub's gender was not immediately known.

"All we've seen so far is a leg and a tail," says Dr Ron Swaisgood, co-head of the zoo's panda program.

The panda showed signs of going into labour, getting restless and frequently shifting position in a private den, Dr Swaisgood says.

When the cub finally came, Bai Yun quickly scooped it up and clutched it to her breast.

The cub hardly cried at all – evidence of its mother's deftness.

"Usually the mother will bobble the cub or her paw will slip and the cub will cry until it's repositioned," says Dr Swaisgood.

"But (Bai Yun) was keeping that cub so content it didn't cry at all. It made a few squawks and that was it."

The newborn panda is about the size of a stick of butter, or one-thousandth the size of its mother, Dr Swaisgood says.

Zookeepers will not get near the cub for at least a few days.

They hope to get a clear view of the creature on a closed-circuit camera, but typically a mother panda will hunch protectively over the cub to obscure it.