Japan spits dummy on whaling


Summary

It failed in its bid to lift a moratorium on commercial whaling at the end of the stormy 75-nation IWC meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.

南宁桑拿

Earlier it had announced it will kill 50 humpback whales from stocks that migrate along the Australian and New Zealand coasts.

It then offered a compromise of shelving the humpback hunting plan if its request for whale hunting by the Japanese coastal community is allowed.

Japan's proposal was submitted under IWC rules allowing aboriginal subsistence whale hunting quotas. It said that small-scale whalers have depended on hunting as far back as the 17th century.

Japan has been campaigning to lift the whaling moratorium ever since it was imposed 21 years ago. But this year, it argues that its traditional coastal community have the same right to pursue whaling as natives in the United States and Russia.

The commission has already agreed that Greenland can increase its aboriginal quota of minke whales to 200 as well as hunt fin and bowhead whales.

Greenland, a semiautonomous Danish territory, had originally wanted to add humpback whales but met adamant opposition from critics who noted that the huge humpbacks and bowheads have low reproduction cycles.

Commercial ban upheld

Meanwhile the commission reaffirmed a 21-year ban on commercial whaling, essentially snubbed a symbolic resolution passed last year that the ban was meant to be temporary and was no longer needed.

This year's resolution also noted there should be no change in restrictions prohibiting the international trade in the meat and other parts of large whales regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

The Japanese remain under fire from environmentalists, for allegedly exploiting an IWC loophole allowing whaling for scientific research.

Japan kills about 1,000 whales a year under its scientific program and then sells the meat.

Boycott splits IWC

In another sign of the commission's deepening rift, Japan and 26 other nations boycotted a vote on a non-binding resolution urging Japan to suspend "lethal aspects" of its scientific whaling program.

The measure, proposed by New Zealand and sponsored by other anti-whaling nations led by the United States, Britain, Australia, France and South Africa, passed 40-2.

Russia and Norway voted against it while China abstained.

"It was a clear division showing the different philosophical camps that are here in the IWC," New Zealand's conservation minister Chris Carter told reporters.

Japan called the move a "hate" resolution, in another example of IWC meetings that are characterised by strong language and emotional arguments.


It failed in its bid to lift a moratorium on commercial whaling at the end of the stormy 75-nation IWC meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.

深圳桑拿网

Earlier it had announced it will kill 50 humpback whales from stocks that migrate along the Australian and New Zealand coasts.

It then offered a compromise of shelving the humpback hunting plan if its request for whale hunting by the Japanese coastal community is allowed.

Japan's proposal was submitted under IWC rules allowing aboriginal subsistence whale hunting quotas. It said that small-scale whalers have depended on hunting as far back as the 17th century.

Japan has been campaigning to lift the whaling moratorium ever since it was imposed 21 years ago. But this year, it argues that its traditional coastal community have the same right to pursue whaling as natives in the United States and Russia.

The commission has already agreed that Greenland can increase its aboriginal quota of minke whales to 200 as well as hunt fin and bowhead whales.

Greenland, a semiautonomous Danish territory, had originally wanted to add humpback whales but met adamant opposition from critics who noted that the huge humpbacks and bowheads have low reproduction cycles.

Commercial ban upheld

Meanwhile the commission reaffirmed a 21-year ban on commercial whaling, essentially snubbed a symbolic resolution passed last year that the ban was meant to be temporary and was no longer needed.

This year's resolution also noted there should be no change in restrictions prohibiting the international trade in the meat and other parts of large whales regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

The Japanese remain under fire from environmentalists, for allegedly exploiting an IWC loophole allowing whaling for scientific research.

Japan kills about 1,000 whales a year under its scientific program and then sells the meat.

Boycott splits IWC

In another sign of the commission's deepening rift, Japan and 26 other nations boycotted a vote on a non-binding resolution urging Japan to suspend "lethal aspects" of its scientific whaling program.

The measure, proposed by New Zealand and sponsored by other anti-whaling nations led by the United States, Britain, Australia, France and South Africa, passed 40-2.

Russia and Norway voted against it while China abstained.

"It was a clear division showing the different philosophical camps that are here in the IWC," New Zealand's conservation minister Chris Carter told reporters.

Japan called the move a "hate" resolution, in another example of IWC meetings that are characterised by strong language and emotional arguments.