Fake sex scandal leads to jail


Summary

Five journalists and a 10th grade literature teacher have been jailed in Mali for reporting on a high

school essay assignment about an imaginary presidential sex scandal.

南宁桑拿

The first to be arrested was Seydine Oumar Diarra, editor of Info-Matin, who was jailed last week after publishing The Mistress of the President, an article featuring an interview with the teacher who assigned the essay about the fictional scandal in order to explore issues of moral corruption.

Mr Diarra was questioned for more than three hours, then taken to the capital’s central prison on charges of offending the head of state.

The literature teacher, Bassirou Kassim Minta, was jailed on the same charge, which carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison and a fine of up to 600,000 CFA ($A1,420).

“This situation is so outrageous that it would be laughable if … people were not in jail,” said Joel Simon, the executive director of New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, which has been monitoring the arrests.

Earlier this week, four others were arrested after reprinting Mr Diarra’s June 1 story as a protest, accompanying the article with editorials critical of the arrests.

They were questioned for four hours before being sent to the same prison, charged with “complicity in offending a head of state”.

200 journalists march in protest

Yesterday a crowd of about 200 journalists marched in the capital to protest the arrests and to hand a letter to Justice Minister Makan Kone.

Security forces fired tear gas at the journalists, injuring Ibrahim Coulibaly, the president of the Mali-based Union of West African Journalists.

Editorials called the arrests “evidence of the dictatorial tendencies of the regime”.


Five journalists and a 10th grade literature teacher have been jailed in Mali for reporting on a high

school essay assignment about an imaginary presidential sex scandal.

苏州皮肤管理中心

The first to be arrested was Seydine Oumar Diarra, editor of Info-Matin, who was jailed last week after publishing The Mistress of the President, an article featuring an interview with the teacher who assigned the essay about the fictional scandal in order to explore issues of moral corruption.

Mr Diarra was questioned for more than three hours, then taken to the capital’s central prison on charges of offending the head of state.

The literature teacher, Bassirou Kassim Minta, was jailed on the same charge, which carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison and a fine of up to 600,000 CFA ($A1,420).

“This situation is so outrageous that it would be laughable if … people were not in jail,” said Joel Simon, the executive director of New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, which has been monitoring the arrests.

Earlier this week, four others were arrested after reprinting Mr Diarra’s June 1 story as a protest, accompanying the article with editorials critical of the arrests.

They were questioned for four hours before being sent to the same prison, charged with “complicity in offending a head of state”.

200 journalists march in protest

Yesterday a crowd of about 200 journalists marched in the capital to protest the arrests and to hand a letter to Justice Minister Makan Kone.

Security forces fired tear gas at the journalists, injuring Ibrahim Coulibaly, the president of the Mali-based Union of West African Journalists.

Editorials called the arrests “evidence of the dictatorial tendencies of the regime”.