Doctor to face expert grilling


Summary

While British police refuse to identify the chief inspector expected to arrive in Brisbane tomorrow to grill Dr Mohammed Haneef, she is one of the most senior officers in the Metropolitan Police's Counter Terrorism Unit.

南宁桑拿

The crack squad, known as SO15, has taken control of the investigations of the failed car bomb attacks in central London last last week and another at Glasgow Airport at the weekend.

SO15 was set up last October to coordinate Britain's counter-terrorism investigations, partly in response to the July 2005 London terror attacks which killed 52 people.

The unit's main role is analyse intelligence on the activities of terrorists and other extremists in London and support the work of the National Coordinator of Terrorist Investigations across Britain.

It works closely with the British Security Service and Secret Intelligence Service.

'Wrongful arrest'

Dr Haneef's family says he is innocent.

They say he was heading to India to see his newborn daughter when he was arrested.

"He has been detained unnecessarily. He is innocent," Qurat-ul-ain, Haneef's mother, told The Associated Press in the southern Indian city of Bangalore.

The son of a school teacher, Dr Haneef was raised in the Karnataka state town of Moodigere. His family now lives in an apartment in an upscale area of Bangalore where they moved after his father died 10 years ago.

He studied at the Rajiv Gandhi Health University's medical college in Bangalore from 1997-2002, The Times of India newspaper quoted S Sachhidanand, a university registrar, as saying.

Dr Haneef's sister, said he was coming to Bangalore from Australia to see his daughter, who was born a week ago. "He called us before leaving (Australia). We came to know about his detention through media," she said.

"He is a responsible citizen of the country and the Indian government should help us get him back," she said. "His aim has been to be a good doctor."

Family cannot contact

The family has not been able to contact Dr Haneef.

"He is all alone there. I am frantically trying to contact him …" Dr Haneef's wife, Firdous, told The Times of India.

Government defends immigration scheme

The federal government has defended the integrity of the class-457 visa Dr Haneef received last year after answering a job advertisement in the British Medical Journal.

The 457 visa scheme allows skilled foreign workers to come to Australia to plug job vacancies that cannot be filled locally. Visa holders can work in Australia for four years and about a quarter become permanent residents.

Immigration Department figures show almost 40,000 people were granted 457 visas last year, including more than 2,000 medical practitioners.

No criminal record

Successful applicants for 457 visas must have satisfactory English and demonstrate they are of "good character" – usually by providing police certificates from their home country.

Applicants will fail the character test if they have a substantial criminal record or an association with an individual or group suspected of having been involved in criminal activity, the department's website says.

Dr Haneef, who has not been charged with any offence, does not have a criminal record and has been described as a model citizen.


While British police refuse to identify the chief inspector expected to arrive in Brisbane tomorrow to grill Dr Mohammed Haneef, she is one of the most senior officers in the Metropolitan Police's Counter Terrorism Unit.

苏州皮肤管理中心

The crack squad, known as SO15, has taken control of the investigations of the failed car bomb attacks in central London last last week and another at Glasgow Airport at the weekend.

SO15 was set up last October to coordinate Britain's counter-terrorism investigations, partly in response to the July 2005 London terror attacks which killed 52 people.

The unit's main role is analyse intelligence on the activities of terrorists and other extremists in London and support the work of the National Coordinator of Terrorist Investigations across Britain.

It works closely with the British Security Service and Secret Intelligence Service.

'Wrongful arrest'

Dr Haneef's family says he is innocent.

They say he was heading to India to see his newborn daughter when he was arrested.

"He has been detained unnecessarily. He is innocent," Qurat-ul-ain, Haneef's mother, told The Associated Press in the southern Indian city of Bangalore.

The son of a school teacher, Dr Haneef was raised in the Karnataka state town of Moodigere. His family now lives in an apartment in an upscale area of Bangalore where they moved after his father died 10 years ago.

He studied at the Rajiv Gandhi Health University's medical college in Bangalore from 1997-2002, The Times of India newspaper quoted S Sachhidanand, a university registrar, as saying.

Dr Haneef's sister, said he was coming to Bangalore from Australia to see his daughter, who was born a week ago. "He called us before leaving (Australia). We came to know about his detention through media," she said.

"He is a responsible citizen of the country and the Indian government should help us get him back," she said. "His aim has been to be a good doctor."

Family cannot contact

The family has not been able to contact Dr Haneef.

"He is all alone there. I am frantically trying to contact him …" Dr Haneef's wife, Firdous, told The Times of India.

Government defends immigration scheme

The federal government has defended the integrity of the class-457 visa Dr Haneef received last year after answering a job advertisement in the British Medical Journal.

The 457 visa scheme allows skilled foreign workers to come to Australia to plug job vacancies that cannot be filled locally. Visa holders can work in Australia for four years and about a quarter become permanent residents.

Immigration Department figures show almost 40,000 people were granted 457 visas last year, including more than 2,000 medical practitioners.

No criminal record

Successful applicants for 457 visas must have satisfactory English and demonstrate they are of "good character" – usually by providing police certificates from their home country.

Applicants will fail the character test if they have a substantial criminal record or an association with an individual or group suspected of having been involved in criminal activity, the department's website says.

Dr Haneef, who has not been charged with any offence, does not have a criminal record and has been described as a model citizen.