Democracy has gone to the dogs


Summary

Now she finds herself in trouble with the law.

南宁桑拿

Jane Balogh said she did it to protest a 2005 voter-registration law that she says makes it too easy for non-US citizens to vote.

She put her phone bill in Duncan's name, then used it as identification to register him as a voter.

She said she submitted ballots in the dog's name in the September and November 2006 and May 2007 elections.

She wrote "VOID" on the ballots and did not cast any actual votes.

A state election worker contacted her the second time a ballot was sent in under Duncan's name to ask about the paw print on the envelope.

"'You can't sign with a paw print,"' the election worker told Ms Balogh on November 9.

"I said, 'He can if he's a dog,"' says Ms Balogh, 66, who lives between Seattle and Tacoma in Washington state in the US.

"I wasn't trying to do anything fraudulent.

“I was trying to prove that our system is flawed.

So I got myself in trouble," Ms Balogh says.

Prosecutors have offered the grandmother and Army veteran a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanour charge of making a false statement to a public official and they will not file a felony charge of providing false information on a voter-registration application.

Ms Balogh says she does not plan to contest the charge because "I know I'm guilty".

Prosecutors said they would recommend she be sentenced to 10 hours of community service, pay a $US250 ($A296) fine and promise not to commit any other crimes for a year.

Acting Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterberg said his office "can't simply look the other way.

They say you should let sleeping dogs lie, but you can't let voting dogs vote."


Now she finds herself in trouble with the law.

苏州皮肤管理中心

Jane Balogh said she did it to protest a 2005 voter-registration law that she says makes it too easy for non-US citizens to vote.

She put her phone bill in Duncan's name, then used it as identification to register him as a voter.

She said she submitted ballots in the dog's name in the September and November 2006 and May 2007 elections.

She wrote "VOID" on the ballots and did not cast any actual votes.

A state election worker contacted her the second time a ballot was sent in under Duncan's name to ask about the paw print on the envelope.

"'You can't sign with a paw print,"' the election worker told Ms Balogh on November 9.

"I said, 'He can if he's a dog,"' says Ms Balogh, 66, who lives between Seattle and Tacoma in Washington state in the US.

"I wasn't trying to do anything fraudulent.

“I was trying to prove that our system is flawed.

So I got myself in trouble," Ms Balogh says.

Prosecutors have offered the grandmother and Army veteran a deal: plead guilty to a misdemeanour charge of making a false statement to a public official and they will not file a felony charge of providing false information on a voter-registration application.

Ms Balogh says she does not plan to contest the charge because "I know I'm guilty".

Prosecutors said they would recommend she be sentenced to 10 hours of community service, pay a $US250 ($A296) fine and promise not to commit any other crimes for a year.

Acting Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterberg said his office "can't simply look the other way.

They say you should let sleeping dogs lie, but you can't let voting dogs vote."