Abbott focuses on passing budget


Summary

Small business and Australian jihadis will be on the federal government’s mind as parliament returns for a fortnight-long sitting.

南宁桑拿

The opposition intends to highlight the “sneaky cuts” hidden in the federal budget.

Labor will pursue this theme both in the lower house where budget bills are up for debate and during estimates hearings when senators get the chance to quiz ministers and senior government officials.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott indicated on Sunday the government will put new counter-terrorism laws to parliament this week.

It’s anticipated these will give the government the power to strip dual nationals of their Australian citizenship if they join terrorist organisations.

The government is also understood to be considering ways to restrict the rights of foreign fighters who only hold Australian citizenship.

But Mr Abbott said it wasn’t his priority to get these new laws passed straight away.

“The priority this week is getting the budget bills through … unleashing the latent creativity of the small businesses of Australia,” he told reporters in Brisbane.

The key measure he wants Labor’s immediate support on is a $20,000 instant asset write-off for small business.

Immigration and national security issues will also come under scrutiny at legal and constitutional affairs committee hearings over the week.

Agriculture department officials are likely to face questions about their handling of the saga involving Hollywood star Johnny Depp’s dogs.

Labor and the Greens will also ask how Barnaby Joyce’s department is handling concerns about Australian cattle being mistreated in Vietnam.

Clive Palmer will introduce a private member’s bill to the lower house aimed at preventing the disclosure by police or other agencies of information that could lead to the death penalty being imposed on Australians overseas.

On Wednesday, the parliament will receive a visit from New Zealand Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae.


Small business and Australian jihadis will be on the federal government’s mind as parliament returns for a fortnight-long sitting.

南宁桑拿

The opposition intends to highlight the “sneaky cuts” hidden in the federal budget.

Labor will pursue this theme both in the lower house where budget bills are up for debate and during estimates hearings when senators get the chance to quiz ministers and senior government officials.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott indicated on Sunday the government will put new counter-terrorism laws to parliament this week.

It’s anticipated these will give the government the power to strip dual nationals of their Australian citizenship if they join terrorist organisations.

The government is also understood to be considering ways to restrict the rights of foreign fighters who only hold Australian citizenship.

But Mr Abbott said it wasn’t his priority to get these new laws passed straight away.

“The priority this week is getting the budget bills through … unleashing the latent creativity of the small businesses of Australia,” he told reporters in Brisbane.

The key measure he wants Labor’s immediate support on is a $20,000 instant asset write-off for small business.

Immigration and national security issues will also come under scrutiny at legal and constitutional affairs committee hearings over the week.

Agriculture department officials are likely to face questions about their handling of the saga involving Hollywood star Johnny Depp’s dogs.

Labor and the Greens will also ask how Barnaby Joyce’s department is handling concerns about Australian cattle being mistreated in Vietnam.

Clive Palmer will introduce a private member’s bill to the lower house aimed at preventing the disclosure by police or other agencies of information that could lead to the death penalty being imposed on Australians overseas.

On Wednesday, the parliament will receive a visit from New Zealand Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae.